Tag Archives: Film

Beauty and the Beast

Over Christmas this year I watched the Disney live action version of “Beauty and the Beast” with my family. I was fascinated by two specific parts of the film which are revealing about US politics and Disney’s place as a prop for the status quo. It’s easy to believe that Disney promotes a reactionary view of society through its depiction of women, gender, and the family. In Beauty and the Beast we are presented with a right wing view of political economy as well.

At the beginning of the film we are presented with an aristocrat whose lifestyle brings down on him the curse of the Enchantress which turns him into the beast. His most important crime is given as impoverishing the villagers by imposing too much tax.

This is the world view of Trump and his tax cutting bill. The prince stands in place of the state and the film gives us the morality of the Tea Party, where the state is considered too intrusive and all tax is bad. Nothing else is said about where the prince’s wealth might have come from or how it will be sustained once it is no longer derived from ‘taxes’.

At the end of the film the prince is released from the curse. His position in society, and therefore presumably also his ability to extract surplus value from the villagers is reinstated. The film ends with a party where the villagers celebrate the return of the prince and his engagement to Belle. Having realised the folly of his earlier life, the prince is now keen to include the villagers. In their turn they no longer present themselves a supplicants or workers but as well dressed and middle class, they fit seamlessly into the etiquette of the castle in both dress and behaviour.

In other words it is not the prince that has changed, but the villagers who no longer seek to challenge the prince’s behaviour but rather accept it and seek to fit in. This is a standard charge by the status quo against those who seek progressive change, the attempt to change the prince was simple the “politics of envy“. The villagers ought to accept that the prince’s lifestyle is one they should aspire to achieve themselves (presumably in competition with each other).

This film then brings a very specific world view to its depiction of the life of the prince and the village. In some ways this is similar to Downton Abbey in its embodiment of conservative values.

I didn’t watch the film closely, but these two fragments stood out to me. Perhaps it is not surprising that a major film studio should reflect the current status quo, and Disney is well known for conservative “family values”. But I must confess that I was surprised to see the political economy of the neoliberal right as well.

Advertisements