Review: The Meaning of Marxism

This is not a terrible book. But it is a limited one. As a basic introduction to a lot of the basic concepts in Marxism it has some merit. D’Amato sweeps across the range of Marxism from the economy to exploitation to the state to the revolutionary party, covering each at a basic introductory level. What then is the problem?

Partly it is that D’Amato’s treatment is quite dogmatic. He discusses Marxism as a fairly monolithic source of truth without acknowledging debate or variation other than to condemn Stalin and Mao as dictatorial and not true Marxists. But Marxism is not a monolithic entity, certainly not anymore. It’s use in the modern world must surely be as an analytical toolkit to prompt debate and the exploration of alternatives to the neoliberal capitalism. This requires the sort of argument that doesn’t form any part of this book. On top of this, D’Amato’s own (undeclared) viewpoint is sectarian Trotskyist, a fairly specific clique within modern socialism.

It doesn’t feel like D’Amato engages with modern uses of Marx’s analysis at all. He doesn’t mention such thinkers as David Harvey or Wolfgang Streeck, both of whom make intelligent use of Marxist thinking to break down modern society and economy. Jodi Dean is mentioned only to attack her as not adhering to the true nature of socialism. Yet these writers (and I’m sure others that D’Amato doesn’t mention) are all critically engaged with Marx and Marxist thought.

In fact this book feels like a simple restatement of a revealed truth. D’Amato quotes Marx and Trotsky extensively, and often follows this up with an assertion that whatever point is being made remains relevant to the modern world, without attempting to actually apply the analysis to the changed world. And it is important to remember that the capitalist world has changed since Marx was alive and we cannot simply treat his work as truth. It is telling that D’Amato quotes the Communist Manifesto extensively, written before Marx began his economic work and while it has value doesn’t reflect the depth of his later work.

It does not feel like D’Amato is trying to reconstruct a modern left progressive movement that can take on the world of capitalism. He is simply reasserting the world view of Trotsky in the 1930’s and D’Amato’s belief that it remains relevant to today.

Finally the bibliography is limited and strongly slanted towards Trotsky and with very few recommendations of modern writers. While it does reference Capital, it doesn’t really provide a guide to getting further into Marx’s analysis (for example D’Amato doesn’t reference key works by Harvey, Michael Heinrich, or Ben Fine that can help ease the difficulty of getting to grips with Marx’s economics).

In short this is a limited book. It does have value, it is written in clear language and covers a wide range of subjects. It is by no means a definitive introduction to the basics of Marxism.

D’Amato, Paul The Meaning of Marxism (Haymarket, Chicago, 2014).

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